Category Archives: Cities

FotoFolio: Museums of Ho Chi Minh – a glimpse into Vietnam’s history

When I booked my Cebu Pacific piso fare from Ho Chi Minh to Manila way before deciding to actually do a Southeast Asia trip, the driving force was to eat the noodle soup pho and the fresh vermicelli spring rolls in Vietnam.

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Oh my PHO!

 

The ignorant that I am of Asian and world history, the only things I knew of Vietnam were the food I wanted to eat and the war with America.

Continue reading FotoFolio: Museums of Ho Chi Minh – a glimpse into Vietnam’s history

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#100Days Photo 29: The Small Pond and the Batu Caves, Selangor, Malaysia

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During the first time I set foot in Malaysia back in 2010, we only had one day and between Melaka, Genting Highlands and the Batu Caves, we decided to play with the clouds. It was only during the month-long Southeast Asia backpacking trip that I made it to Melaka and to the Batu Caves, both thanks to my fried Rajie who took time off her busy schedule to tour me, Lalai and Tetet! 🙂 Anyway, Batu Caves, as the name suggests (in Tagalog, batu, well bato, means stone), is a series of caves and cave temples inside a limestone hill. Batu Caves is a popular tourist spot and Hindu temple site around 13kms north of Kuala Lumpur, the capital city of Malaysia. The area is surrounded by birds feeding on corn kernels the visitors throw around and by a small pond of ducks and koi fish. You’d need to climb up about 8-10 floors worth of stairs, alongside monkeys that can be pretty violent when they see food, to get inside the caves and the temples. Rajie, at the time at least, was not a devout Hindu so we were not sure whether the stories of Kartikeya (the massive golden statue at the foot of the caves to which the cave temples are dedicated to), and his family (daddy = Shiva, mommy = Parvati, brother = Ganapathi) and the peacock he’s riding, were as accurate as the scripts or just made up bedtime stories! It was quite entertaining though. 🙂 After visiting the caves, you might want to relax your legs and knees a bit and stay a while by the small pond, watching the ducks and koi fish glide and swim. Or, you can also pay a visit to Lord Hanuman, the monkey god, farther on the left.

#100Days Photo 28: Chao Phraya River and the Bhumibol Bridge, Bangkok, Thailand

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The Me Nam Chao Phraya is a major river in Thailand, even referred to as the River of Kings. On my second day in Bangkok, during my Rattanakosin Island walkabout, I ended up in a plaza across Wat Arun (Temple of the Dawn) where the Chao Phraya river has overflowed, swallowing most of the benches by the riverbanks. If you remember the flooding in Bangkok and Thailand in October 2011, you wouldn’t think that the overflow from the calm Chao Phraya River can be the cause for severe flooding in many of the provinces and its capital city. This photo, taken the next day when I explored Bangkok outside of Rattanakosin, was when I took the Chao Phraya Express Boat so I can have a closer look at some of the sights I have missed! Also coz I’m so cheap to buy the dinner river cruise ticket. Hehe 🙂 We passed under the towering Industrial Ring Road Bridge or officially, the Bhumibol Bridge, named after King Bhumibol Adulyadej (apparently, naming bridges after Kings is customary). By the time I left Bangkok the day after, the city was already frantic trying to prepare for the floods — communities passing and arranging sandbags, construction of 2-feet cemented walls by their homes’ doors, diversion of traffic in some areas. Although the Chao Phraya River caused misery to many Thai people, the River of Kings remain to be an important part of their daily lives — either for agriculture, trade or transport. I hope measures, by government and the communities, are being taken so that the October flooding won’t happen to Bangkok or to Thailand again.

Viahera Vlogs: Qutb Minar – revisiting the remnants of a new era

Qutb Minar and Alai Darwaza, entrance gate to the Quwwatu'l-Islam Mosque
Qutb Minar and Alai Darwaza, entrance gate to the Quwwatu’l-Islam Mosque

It was a pretty cold winter afternoon in New Delhi, January 2 if I’m not mistaken, when I met with Julie and her holidaying parents to visit the Qutb Minar and it monuments. It was my 5th attempt to visit Qutb Minar as I have been trying to do it every time I set foot in Delhi! Continue reading Viahera Vlogs: Qutb Minar – revisiting the remnants of a new era

#100Days Photo 25: Mahim Bay and the Bandra-Worli Sea Link, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

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Located at Land’s End in Bandra, this area kissing Mahim Bay and overlooking the Bandra-Worli Sea Link is a favorite spot among young Mumbaikaars, families and tourists. Further from the rocky shore, it was really fun playing with the strong waves of Mahim Bay, praying that we don’t get washed away! (ah, memories!) At the end of the kilometer-long Bandstand Promenade, you will find Bandra Fort (also known as Castella de Aguada or Fort of the Waterpoint). While the remains of the castle/fort no longer serves the purpose it was built for by the Portuguese before, it still serves as a viewpoint for the entire Mahim Bay and the Arabian Sea. From here, you can see the towering glory of the 5.6km-long Bandra-Worli Sea Link. Constructed to ease traffic congestion, the Rajiv Gandhi Sea Link (official name) connects Bandra in the Western Suburbs and Worli in South Mumbai.