Tag Archives: religion

Viahera Vlogs: Charminar and Mecca Masjid at Hyderabad, Andra Pradesh, India

The most iconic monument of Hyderabad in Andra Pradesh (south India), Charminar is said to have been built between 1589 to 1592 BC (dates are not still debatable). It was supposed to be a monument to commemorate the founding of a new capital and the end of a plague. Charminar was commissioned by Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah, the 5th ruler of the Golconda Sultanate. Learn more about Chaminar at Wikipedia.

Exploring Hyderabad: Charminar and Mecca Masjid

Beside Charminar is the Mecca Masjid (Makkah Masjid), one of the oldest mosques in India. It is called Mecca Masjid as Qutb Shah ordered the soil from Mecca to be made into bricks that were used in building the Masjid. Learn more about Mecca Masjid at Wikipedia.

Viahe Vlogs - Charminar - Palace Hospital and Mecca Masjid
View from the top: Nizamia Tibbi College and Hospital and Makkah Masjid along Charminar Road

Reminder: Women going inside the Charminar are not permitted alone, for some reasons I did not understand, nor explained. My CouchSurfing host Bhavesh for my Hyderabad/Secunderabad trip also was not able to explain. However, a dark secret was shared while we were on top: it’s a suicidal area, much like the famous bridges where people jump! Scary! This is also why visitors were limited to only the “first landing” area of the Charminar, which by the way is about six-floors high! So get ready! (I wasn’t as I was still carrying my weekender pack with additional sarees I just bought!)

Charminar: View from the top

The view from the top of Charminar lets you see the other major landmarks of Hyderabad like the High Court and Patel Market (garments and pearls) on one side, Laad Bazaar (bangles market) on another, then the Makkah Masjid area, and a former palace turned into a college and hospital. Hyderabad, actually, is called the City of Palaces, among its other monikers!

Viahe Vlogs - Charminar - Palace turned Hospital
Very busy Charminar Road

FotoFolio: Kailash Temple, Ellora Caves, Aurangabad

I spent the weekend on top of the world—well, on top of cliffs and mountain-plateaus to have better viewpoints of the Ajanta and Ellora caves, with the Kailash Temple as one of the highlights of my Aurangabad cave exploration!

Kailash Temple
View from the Top: Kailash Temple and its ornate designs and carvings, surrounded by the cliff from which it was made from (see the people climbing up?) and the garden/park

Here’s a basic description of the Kailash Temple, according to Wikipedia: Kailashnath Temple, also Kailash Temple or Kailasanath Temple is a famous temple, one of the 34 monasteries and temples, known collectively as the Ellora Caves, extending over more than 2 km, that were dug side by side in the wall of a high basalt cliff in the complex located at Ellora, Maharashtra, India. Of these 34 monasteries and temples, the Kailasa (cave 16) is a remarkable example of Dravidian architecture on account of its striking proportion; elaborate workmanship architectural content and sculptural ornamentation of rock-cut architecture.[1] It is designed to recall Mount Kailash, the abode of Lord Shiva.[2] It is a megalith carved out of one single rock. It was built in the 8th century by the Rashtrakuta king Krishna I.

Elephant and Pillar at Kailash
View from the left-side terrace (second level): massive elephant rock sculpture, towering pillar, and temple areas containing the Shiva lingam and Nandi (Shiva’s bull), adorned by carvings of deities, celestial nymphs, elephants, lion, dragons (and the mix of three creatures in one!)

And, according to me, the Kailash Temple is a magnificent symbol of millennium-old awesomeness of Indian architecture, religion and culture. The entire complex of Ellora Caves actually! Whenever you are in Aurangabad, a visit to the Ajanta caves (totally different area) and Ellora Caves is a must and marveling at the Kailash Temple is a delight. Now, climbing on top of the high basalt cliff from which the Kailashnath Temple is carved from? That is another experience altogether. If you can do that, you’ll see the Kailash Temple from a different angle and really, maybe you’d feel like Shiva looking over his worshippers!

Intimate Couples at Kailash Temple
If you are observant enough, or not yet overwhelmed by the number of carvings waiting to be admired, you will notice sculptures of couples in intimate scenarios